Boye History

Boye History as provided by Sylvia Ourada – 1997

Company’s registered trademark is “WORLD’S STANDARD OF QUALITY”

Boye never made a hook out of real bone, always a type of plastic.

  • 1906 – Company founded in Chicago, IL.
  • 1906 – Introduced Rotary Case.
  • 1909 – Moved into present location in Chicago, IL.
  • 1917 – Introduced the first complete line of steel crochet hooks made in America. Sold for 5 cents each. Sizes #1 to #14.
  • 1917 – Introduced knitting needles.
  • 1921 – Introduced sewing needles.
  • 1922 – Introduced 9″ steel. Sizes C, D and E. Sold for $1.02/dozen.
  • 1923 August – Sizes G and J first sold to the trade? for $2.40/dozen.
  • 1923 October – Interchangeable crochet hooks and handles first sold to the trade.
  • 1923 – Introduced 9″ Nickel Plated Aluminum hooks. Sizes F, G, H, I and J. Sold for $1.80/dozen.
  • 1924 July – Interchangeable “cabinet assortment” first sold, following itemized:

“Boye” Interchangeable Crochet Hook Cabinet Proposition.

14 Cel. Handles & Hooks Ea. 23 cents $3.22

22 Cel. Handles & Hooks Ea. 15 cents $3.30

1 Gross Hooks Ea. 8 cents $11.52

Total $18.04

Interchangeable Cabinet Loaned

  • 1924 August – Sizes C and E first sold to the trade? for $1.10/dozen.
  • 1924 November – Introduced size #15. Sold for 96 cents/dozen.
  • 1924 December – Introduced sizes #00 and #0. Sold for 60 cents or 69 cents/dozen.
  • 1925 February – Flats changed to read “Made in U.S.A. and “14 Boye 14” on reverse side.
  • 1926 January – Size K aluminum double end hook first sold to the trade for 35 cents each or $4.25/dozen. Discontinued May 19, 1931.
  • 1926 March – Introduced G 6″ steel hook for 75 cents/dozen.
  • 1926 November – Introduced I steel hook for 96 cents/dozen.
  • 1926 – Introduced embroidery hoops.
  • 1928 – First sold size K to trade for $2.40/dozen.
  • 1930 – Introduced rug punch needles.
  • 1932 May – Changed to lacquered aluminum for chain stores. Discontinued lacquered aluminum hooks in February 1935.
  • 1932 – Introduced punch embroidery needles.
  • 1932 – Imported circular knitting needles.
  • 1932 October 3 – Special sample assortment of Interchangeable Crochet Hooks sold as follows:

Packed 1 each Interchangeable Hook #1 to #14 and 1 Handle in a gold box, green velvet lined at 62 cents per box – $7.44/dozen.

Sizes 1, 2 and 3 Hooks made with Bone Handle, 1 dozen assorted to a box at 96 cents per box (8/6/31)

Discontinued this sampler 12/2/1941

  • 1934 – Perfection Points trademark.
  • 1934 – Introduced stitch holders.
  • 1934 – Introduced point protectors.
  • 1935 February – Discontinued lacquered aluminum hooks.
  • 1935 – Introduced crochet forks.
  • 1935 – Introduced circular knitting needles.
  • 1935 – Plastic hooks introduced.
  • 1939 February – #G and #I 6″ steel hooks first sold to general trade for 75 cents/dozen.
  • 1939 October – Introduced 9″ Red Birchwood crochet hooks. Sizes 10, 13, 14 and 15. Sold for 66 cents/dozen.
  • 1941 July 22 – “Boye” G and I 6″ steel crochet hooks sold to the retail trade for 75 cents/dozen.
  • 1941 December 2 – Discontinued sampler of 10/8/1932.
  • 1942 May 1 – Nickel plating stopped by government order.
  • 1942 June 8 – Black plating of crochet hooks began using “Hoto Black Process”. All nickel plated items will be black plated for the duration of the war!
  • 1942 June 17 – Discontinued all 14″ aluminum hooks due to war restrictions.
  • 1942 June 25 – Discontinued “Boye” G and I 6″ steel crochet hooks.
  • 1942 August – Government orders halt production on all Steel crochet hooks and knitting pins!
  • 1943 March 31 – #0 steel crochet hooks discontinued.
  • 1943 April 14- #00 steel crochet hooks discontinued by salesmen?
  • 1944 April – #0 and #00 steel crochet hooks reinstated.
  • 1945 May – Nickel plating reinstated latter part of month.
  • 1947 February 11 – “Boye” #G and #I steel crochet hook line reinstated for $1.02/dozen (war is over).
  • 1947 – Introduced 7″ double point knitting needles.
  • 1949 January 18 – 6″ Aluminum crochet hooks released in colors – dubonnet, starlight blue, aqua and silver!
  • 1949 July 6 – Introduced anodized aluminum hooks in sized G and J for $3.00/dozen.
  • 1950 – Introduced knitting tallies.
  • 1953- Introduced 10″ double point knitting needles.
  • 1954- Introduced 10″ single point knitting needles.
  • 1955 – Introduced yarn bobbins.
  • 1956 February 14- Introduced K hook sold for $3.30/dozen.
  • 1956 – Introduced knit gauge.
  • 1957 – Introduced carbone rings.
  • 1957 – Introduced cable stitch needles.
  • 1958 – Introduced latch hooks.
  • 1961 – Introduced flexible knitting needles.
  • 1965 – Introduced NeedleMaster interchangeable knitting set.
  • 1967 – Introduced crochet hook size standards.
  • 1980 – NeedleMaster updated.
  • 1983- Introduced Comfort crochet hooks.
  • 1985 – Balene implements introduced and has since then been discontinued.
  • 1989 – Introduced KnitMates interchangeable knitting program.
  • 1991 – NeedleMaster updated.
  • 1992 – Introduced Doll hair curlers.

 

From Jean Leinhauser 2 Mar 2009

I was Design Director for the Boye Needle Company from 1964 to 1971, so I have a lot of historical material on them from the old files.

Boye was founded in 1906 in Chicago and originally made drapery hardware and sewing machine accessories.

In 1917 Boye introduced the first complete line of steel crochet hooks made in the USA. These were the smaller sizes designed for thread work, from Size 1 on down to 16.
Prior to that they were imported from England and Germany.

In 1922 they added sizes C D and E to the steel hook line. In 1923 they added suzes G and J in steel. Also in 1923 they introduced 9″ long nickel plated aluminum hooks in sizes F,G, H, I and J.

During World War 2, in 1942 all steel hook production was prohibited by law for the duration.

The colorful anodized aluminum crochet hooks that we know so well today were introduced in January of 1949, initially in colors of dubonnet, starlight blue, aqua, and silver.

 

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